Ubuntu / Linux Mint – Installing MediaInfo From PPA

MediaInfo is a handy application for querying media files about their video and audio bitrates and video resolution and so on:

  • General: title, author, director, album, track number, date, duration…
  • Video: codec, aspect, fps, bitrate…
  • Audio: codec, sample rate, channels, language, bitrate…
  • Text: language of subtitle
  • Chapters: number of chapters, list of chapters
  • Video: MKV, OGM, AVI, DivX, WMV, QuickTime, Real, MPEG-1, MPEG-2, MPEG-4, DVD (VOB)…
    (Codecs: DivXXviD, MSMPEG4, ASP, H.264, AVC…)
  • Audio: OGG, MP3, WAV, RA, AC3, DTS, AAC, M4A, AU, AIFF…
  • Subtitles: SRT, SSA, ASS, SAMI…

Installing MediaInfo on Ubuntu 9.10 (Karmic) and later releases is very simple via Personal Package Archive (PPA). Open a Terminal and enter the following commands:

sudo add-apt-repository ppa:shiki/mediainfo
sudo apt-get update
sudo apt-get install mediainfo-gui

Now that MediaInfo is installed you can just drag and drop files into the application to query them.

That’s it!

Ubuntu / Linux Mint – User is not in the sudoers file. This incident will be reported.

In my previous post I followed documentation for VirtualBox to get USB working in my Virtual Machines (VM) and issued the following command: sudo usermod -G vboxusers mike. This command resulted in this error message when I subsequently tried to use the sudo command:

mike is not in the sudoers file. This incident will be reported.

I could no longer issue sudo commands – but all was not lost.

I decided to compare the user permissions on my now broken Linux Mint installation to the user permissions on my Ubuntu 11.10 VM that I had just installed (prior to running the command that broke things). I assumed that the settings between the two would be close enough – but given more time I probably have installed Linux Mint in a VM to make the comparison.

On broken Linux Mint system I issued the id username command:

id mike
uid=1000(mike) gid=1000(mike) groups=1000(mike),125(vboxusers)

On my Ubuntu 11.10 VM I got a rather different result:

id mike
uid=1000(mike) gid=1000(mike) groups=1000(mike),4(adm),20(dialout)
,24(cdrom),46(plugdev),116(lpadmin),118(admin),124(sambashare)

These permissions are contained in the file /etc/group and so I used the output from the Ubuntu VM as a guide to fixing permissions in /etc/group on Linux Mint. It should be noted that the Linux Mint and Ubuntu versions of /etc/group are not identical – so pay attention when editing this file.

To edit /etc/group I rebooted and selected the recovery mode option from the grub boot menu. I then chose the option to drop into a root prompt and supplied my user password as credentials.

I then edited /etc/group with nano and appended my username to the entries that I needed to correct.

sudo nano /etc/group

For example, I changed adm:x:4: to adm:x:4:mike. As you can see below the numerical sequence is not the same as for my Ubuntu VM but it is straight-forward enough to see which lines to append with your username.

#My amended /etc/group file on Linux Mint
root:x:0:
daemon:x:1:
bin:x:2:
sys:x:3:
adm:x:4:mike
tty:x:5:
disk:x:6:
lp:x:7:
mail:x:8:
news:x:9:
uucp:x:10:
man:x:12:
proxy:x:13:
kmem:x:15:
dialout:x:20:mike
fax:x:21:
voice:x:22:
cdrom:x:24:mike
floppy:x:25:
tape:x:26:
sudo:x:27:
audio:x:29:pulse
dip:x:30:
www-data:x:33:
backup:x:34:
operator:x:37:
list:x:38:
irc:x:39:
src:x:40:
gnats:x:41:
shadow:x:42:
utmp:x:43:
video:x:44:
sasl:x:45:
plugdev:x:46:mike
staff:x:50:
games:x:60:
users:x:100:
nogroup:x:65534:
libuuid:x:101:
crontab:x:102:
syslog:x:103:
fuse:x:104:
messagebus:x:105:
mlocate:x:106:
ssh:x:107:
avahi-autoipd:x:108:
avahi:x:109:
netdev:x:110:
bluetooth:x:111:
lpadmin:x:112:mike
ssl-cert:x:113:
gdm:x:114:
nopasswdlogin:x:115:
pulse:x:116:
pulse-access:x:117:
utempter:x:118:
rtkit:x:119:
admin:x:120:mike
saned:x:121:
sambashare:x:122:mike
mike:x:1000:
couchdb:x:123:
winbindd_priv:x:124:
vboxusers:x:125:mike

All that was left to do was to reboot and the problem was fixed.

VirtualBox 4.x – Failed To Access The USB Subsystem

I’ve just installed VirtualBox on my Linux Mint 11 (Katya) laptop and get the following error when I try to edit the settings on my Ubuntu 11.10 virtual machine:

VirtualBox is not currently allowed to access USB devices. You can change this by adding your user to the ‘vboxusers‘ group. Please see user manual for more detailed explanation.

To add your username to the vboxusers group enter the following command in the terminal (where “your-user-name” is your username on the computer):

sudo usermod -a -G vboxusers your-user-name

All that is left to do after this is reboot your computer.

Thanks to Sebastian for his comment regarding the addition of the -a switch to the usermod command.

Linux Mint – How To Remove The Fortune Cookie Messages From The Terminal

If you want to remove the fortune cookie messages that appear whenever you open a Terminal in Linux Mint, here is how to do it.

Click the Menu and then Terminal (or press Ctrl + Alt + T) to open a Terminal and then enter this command:

gksu gedit /etc/bash.bashrc

Scroll down to the bottom of the file and comment out (or remove) the line /usr/games/fortune:

#/usr/games/fortune

Press the Save button.

Source: Mint forum

Linux Mint 9 (Isadora) – Installing Ubuntu One

Installing Ubuntu One to sync files, contacts and Tomboy Notes is quite straight-forward in Linux Mint 9 (which is built on Ubuntu) but there are a couple of caveats.

You can install Ubuntu One by simply typing this into the Terminal:

sudo apt-get update
sudo apt-get install ubuntuone-client-gnome

The problem however appears when you try to install the plugin (Bindwood) to sync Firefox bookmarks in the Ubuntu One application. Not only does it not work – it also messes up an entry in your /etc/apt/sources.list. This means that you will get an error when you run update manager (and you will have an icon in the taskbar that reminds you of this all the time).

To avoid this problem you can install the Bindwood plugin manually as follows:

sudo apt-get install xul-ext-bindwood

If you need to correct your /etc/apt/sources.list this can be done as follows, In the Terminal type:

sudo gedit /etc/apt/sources.list

Look for the deb http://packages.linuxmint.com/ isadora main upstream import universe entry and remove “universe” from the end of it so that it looks like this:

deb http://packages.linuxmint.com/ isadora main upstream import

Save the file and close the file editor and then update your repositories again:

sudo apt-get update

Source: bugs.launchpad.net

Ubuntu 10.4 / Linux Mint 9 Isadora – Flash Player Is Out Of Date

After using Ubuntu 11.4 (Natty) for a while I’ve decided to install Linux Mint 9 Isadora (which is built on Ubuntu 10.4 (the last Long Term Support release)). In the end Natty and Unity did not seem polished enough to me (so I will revisit Unity with subsequent releases to see how it is progressing).

I did like the almost full-screen browsing experience that Natty delivered as well as the ability to sync files, contacts and Tomboy Notes with Ubuntu One. With this in mind Mint 9 seemed like a good choice – I liked that it only featured one panel at the bottom of the screen and the Mint menu is well thought out. Add to that the fact that things like Flash are already installed and that I can type directly into the Mint menu to search for installed software and I was sold.

I installed Mint 9 on two machines this week and was surprised when one of them reported that Flash was out of date (in both Firefox and Chromium). I checked Update Manager and tried re-installing flashplugin-nonfree to no avail.

I soon found a fix on the Ubuntu Forum though, which cleans up possible conflicting versions of Flash that might be installed and then re-installs flashplugin-nonfree from the repositories:

sudo apt-get purge lightspark
sudo apt-get purge swfdec-mozilla
sudo apt-get purge mozilla-plugin-gnash
sudo apt-get purge adobe-flashplugin
sudo apt-get purge flashplugin-nonfree
sudo apt-get purge flashplugin-installer
rm -f /home/**/.mozilla/plugins/*flash*so
rm -rf /home/**/.wine/dosdevices/c:/windows/system32/Macromed/Flash
sudo rm -f /usr/lib/firefox-addons/plugins/libflashplayer.so
sudo rm -f /usr/lib/mozilla/plugins/libflashplayer.so
sudo apt-get install flashplugin-nonfree
sudo ln -s /usr/lib/mozilla/plugins/flashplugin-alternative.so
/usr/lib/firefox-addons/plugins/libflashplayer.so

This glitch aside I am quite impressed with Mint so far – it has a great selection of applications and is quite user friendly too.