Moving from Windows 10 Mobile to Android – Tip 3 – Transferring Text Messages

The need for a new phone, the lack of Windows 10 Mobile hardware on any carriers, and the need to switch carriers saw me waving goodbye to Windows 10 Mobile yesterday. And so, I found myself in the position of needing to move my data from Microsoft services to Android / Google.

To backup my SMS messages from my Microsoft Account I used the WP Message Backup app from the Windows Store on my Windows 10 PC. The app will backup 100 messages for free. I did not check the cost of backing up 10,000 messages (as I had more than that) and so I opted for unlimited which cost $5.49.

The app is easy to use – select Windows Phone 8.x or Windows Phone 10 and then sign in to your Microsoft Account. If you have a lot of messages it will take quite some time to populate.

When the app has finished loading your message click the List button.

Click the Select All button (if you want to export all messages) otherwise manually check messages in the list and then click the Save button.

Click the Android (xml) radio button. Before you export you will need to review the number of messages you need to export vs the free and paid options that the app offers. I paid for unlimited message export. Click the Export button and then save your .xml file to your PC.

WP Message Backup did throw up an error message at the end of my export and notified me that 288 messages could not be saved. I wasn’t too worried about it – I still had over 11,000 messages successfully exported.

I transferred the .xml file to my phone using USB – you could use cloud storage if you prefer.

On my phone I installed SMS Back & Restore to import my messages. It took a little while, and the Messaging app was a little flaky while I went through and weeded out all the junk. All things considered the migration was a success!

 

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Moving from Windows 10 Mobile to Android – Tip 2 – Playing Music Offline with Groove Music

The need for a new phone, the lack of Windows 10 Mobile hardware on any carriers, and the need to switch carriers saw me waving goodbye to Windows 10 Mobile yesterday.

And so, I found myself in the position of needing to move my data from Microsoft services to Android / Google.

On Windows 10 I had long been ripping my Cds to mp3 and copying them directly to the Music folder on my SD card on Windows Phone. All I had to do in Groove on my phone was point the app to the folder with my music and I could listen to everything offline.

I found it rather odd that Groove on Android did not behave the same way. I tried copying my music directly to the Music folder on my phone but could not see any option to point Groove to that folder.

The rather odd solution is to use OneDrive to sync music between Windows and Android (which takes time).

I copied my mp3 file structure from my SD card to my PC and then up to the Music folder on OneDrive.  When the upload was eventually complete I could finally see my music on my Android phone. From the Groove hamburger menu I selected My music and then clicked the Refine drop down menu and selected OneDrive from the list.

But, at this point my music was still not available offline. I had manually tell Groove to download each album, from OneDrive, one at a time. To do this tap on an album and then tap the ellipsis menu and select Download from the list. Repeat for each album!

What should have been a simple process ended up being rather cumbersome. Sure, I could have just copied my music to the phone and used the stock Android music player – but I wanted to use Groove, because I like the dark theme.

Clearly the Windows Phone app is more refined – shocker!

Moving from Windows 10 Mobile to Android – Tip 1 – Contacts

The need for a new phone, the lack of Windows 10 Mobile hardware on any carriers, and the need to switch carriers saw me waving goodbye to Windows 10 Mobile yesterday.

And so, I found myself in the position of needing to move my data from Microsoft services to Android / Google.

I started with my contacts and found that importing from Outlook.com to Google was straightforward enough.

First log into Gmail and then switch to Contacts using the drop down menu.

Click the More drop down menu and then click Import.

Click on Outlook.com to import contacts from other accounts.

Click I Agree, Let’s go!

Sign in to your Microsoft account.

The starting import dialogue will appear.

Give your Google account permission to access your Outlook.com data. Click Yes.

Wait for the process to complete.

If it doesn’t happen straight away you can open your Contacts app on your Android phone, tap the menu (three vertical dots) and then tap Sync now.

Windows 10 UWP – Template 10 Mobile Status Bar

Windows-Dev

Template 10 is a set of Visual Studio project templates for Windows 10 XAML / C# apps.

In my previous post I set the app theme to Light and found that the status bar was completely white on Windows 10 Mobile. The status icons were no longer visible.

Before we can make changes to the status bar we first need to add Windows Mobile Extensions for the UWP  to our references:

In the Solution Explorer right click on References and then click Add Reference. In the left pane select Universal Windows and then Extensions from the drop down menu. In the right hand pane select Windows Mobile Extensions for the UWP and click OK.

Now we can customize the status bar by adding the highlighted code to App.xaml.cs.

public override async Task OnStartAsync(StartKind startKind, IActivatedEventArgs args)
        {
            // TODO: add your long-running task here
            await NavigationService.NavigateAsync(typeof(Views.MainPage));
           
            //Set StatusBar background and foreground colors
            if (Windows.Foundation.Metadata.ApiInformation.IsTypePresent("Windows.UI.ViewManagement.StatusBar"))

            {
                var statusBar = StatusBar.GetForCurrentView();
                if (statusBar != null)
                {
                    statusBar.BackgroundOpacity = 1;
                    statusBar.BackgroundColor = Colors.Orange;
                    statusBar.ForegroundColor = Colors.White;
                }

Next just add the required using statements as prompted by Visual Studio.

As you can see I set the background color to orange and the text to white:

uwp-status-bar

Sources:

View story at Medium.com

https://stenobot.wordpress.com/2015/07/08/uwp-app-development-styling-the-mobile-status-bar/

https://blogs.msdn.microsoft.com/gianlucb/2015/10/08/uwp-windows-10-app-titlebar-and-status-bar-customization/

Windows 10 UWP – Setting a Light Theme in Template 10

Windows-Dev

Template 10 is a set of Visual Studio project templates for Window 10 XAML / C# apps. By default Template 10 uses the Dark theme.

If you need to switch the Light theme you can add the following code to App.xaml in <common:Bootstrapper:

RequestedTheme="Light"

To see this change in your project, save changes and restart Visual Studio.

Windows 10 Mobile – Outlook Mail: There is not enough memory or disk space to update the display

Windows-Dev

I got this error today opening an email in the Outlook Mail app on my Lumia 640XL running Windows 10. I am using the Insider app and am on the production ring:

There is not enough memory or disk space to update the display.

Currently the Outlook Mail app cannot be reinstalled on Windows 10 Mobile – this left me with the option of doing a hard reset as follows:

Swipe down from the top of the screen and then tap All Settings, System, and then About. Scroll down, then tap Reset your phone, and then follow the prompts.

Once I reset my phone and updated the Outlook Mail and Outlook Calendar app my phone functioned correctly again.

If you find an alternative work-around please let me know in the comments below.

Windows Runtime – Special Characters in JSON (Parsed as HTML)

Windows-Dev

My app in progress uses a JSON data file that is parsed as HTML so that I can add bold and other useful HTML attributes to my data.

Until today, none of the special characters that I used within my bold tags presented any issues: *, ?, [ ], { }, !, >, >>

But, when I got the to the less than sign it was parsed as the opening of another HTML tag, and broke my lovely bold tags!

The solution was simple enough – simply encode the less than sign as I would in standard HTML, thus: &lt;

So even though it works on WordPress, this is wrong:

<b><</b>

And this is right:

<b>&lt;</b>

Happy coding!